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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing June - 2017
 
  Friday
Jun-30
'John was a preacher, a prophet, a signpost pointing people in the right direction. We can pray today for all those people who acted as signposts in our lives and brought us closer to God'~Jane Mellett

Last Saturday (June 24th) we celebrated the feast of John the Baptist. The eve of this feast day is marked in Cork with lots of bonfires, even though the connection with the feast day of St. John has largely been forgotten. The feast day of St. John the Baptist also coincides with the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. Long before Christianity took root, people placed great hope in light and that light would always conquer darkness.

John the Baptist was a celebrity in his own way. Thousands flocked to hear him and be baptised by him. But John was not interested in fame. He never wanted to draw attention to himself. John's mission was to prepare the way for Jesus. He was a bit like a grounds man before an important game. He lined the pitch, mowed the grass just right and got everything ready as it should be. Then when the game started he stepped back knowing his job was done. There are many people who quietly work away in a similar way. The work they do is vitally important and often they do not get the praise or attention they deserve.

John wanted to draw attention only to Jesus. Sometimes we hang our heads and often we're not proud of what we believe in. It's almost as if it is unfashionable and a bit embarrassing to say we believe. John was the exact opposite. He had no reservations and no inhibitions in proclaiming that he was proud to be a follower of Jesus. We too are called to hold our heads up. We are called to be proud of what we believe and to be grateful that we have indeed something to build our lives on.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jun-29
'John was a preacher, a prophet, a signpost pointing people in the right direction. We can pray today for all those people who acted as signposts in our lives and brought us closer to God'~Jane Mellett

Last Saturday (June 24th) we celebrated the feast of John the Baptist. The eve of this feast day is marked in Cork with lots of bonfires, even though the connection with the feast day of St. John has largely been forgotten. The feast day of St. John the Baptist also coincides with the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. Long before Christianity took root, people placed great hope in light and that light would always conquer darkness.

John the Baptist was a celebrity in his own way. Thousands flocked to hear him and be baptised by him. But John was not interested in fame. He never wanted to draw attention to himself. John's mission was to prepare the way for Jesus. He was a bit like a grounds man before an important game. He lined the pitch, mowed the grass just right and got everything ready as it should be. Then when the game started he stepped back knowing his job was done. There are many people who quietly work away in a similar way. The work they do is vitally important and often they do not get the praise or attention they deserve.

John wanted to draw attention only to Jesus. Sometimes we hang our heads and often we're not proud of what we believe in. It's almost as if it is unfashionable and a bit embarrassing to say we believe. John was the exact opposite. He had no reservations and no inhibitions in proclaiming that he was proud to be a follower of Jesus. We too are called to hold our heads up. We are called to be proud of what we believe and to be grateful that we have indeed something to build our lives on.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jun-28
'John was a preacher, a prophet, a signpost pointing people in the right direction. We can pray today for all those people who acted as signposts in our lives and brought us closer to God'~Jane Mellett

Last Saturday (June 24th) we celebrated the feast of John the Baptist. The eve of this feast day is marked in Cork with lots of bonfires, even though the connection with the feast day of St. John has largely been forgotten. The feast day of St. John the Baptist also coincides with the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. Long before Christianity took root, people placed great hope in light and that light would always conquer darkness.

John the Baptist was a celebrity in his own way. Thousands flocked to hear him and be baptised by him. But John was not interested in fame. He never wanted to draw attention to himself. John's mission was to prepare the way for Jesus. He was a bit like a grounds man before an important game. He lined the pitch, mowed the grass just right and got everything ready as it should be. Then when the game started he stepped back knowing his job was done. There are many people who quietly work away in a similar way. The work they do is vitally important and often they do not get the praise or attention they deserve.

John wanted to draw attention only to Jesus. Sometimes we hang our heads and often we're not proud of what we believe in. It's almost as if it is unfashionable and a bit embarrassing to say we believe. John was the exact opposite. He had no reservations and no inhibitions in proclaiming that he was proud to be a follower of Jesus. We too are called to hold our heads up. We are called to be proud of what we believe and to be grateful that we have indeed something to build our lives on.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jun-27
'John was a preacher, a prophet, a signpost pointing people in the right direction. We can pray today for all those people who acted as signposts in our lives and brought us closer to God'~Jane Mellett

Last Saturday (June 24th) we celebrated the feast of John the Baptist. The eve of this feast day is marked in Cork with lots of bonfires, even though the connection with the feast day of St. John has largely been forgotten. The feast day of St. John the Baptist also coincides with the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. Long before Christianity took root, people placed great hope in light and that light would always conquer darkness.

John the Baptist was a celebrity in his own way. Thousands flocked to hear him and be baptised by him. But John was not interested in fame. He never wanted to draw attention to himself. John's mission was to prepare the way for Jesus. He was a bit like a grounds man before an important game. He lined the pitch, mowed the grass just right and got everything ready as it should be. Then when the game started he stepped back knowing his job was done. There are many people who quietly work away in a similar way. The work they do is vitally important and often they do not get the praise or attention they deserve.

John wanted to draw attention only to Jesus. Sometimes we hang our heads and often we're not proud of what we believe in. It's almost as if it is unfashionable and a bit embarrassing to say we believe. John was the exact opposite. He had no reservations and no inhibitions in proclaiming that he was proud to be a follower of Jesus. We too are called to hold our heads up. We are called to be proud of what we believe and to be grateful that we have indeed something to build our lives on.
 
 
 
  Monday
Jun-26
'John was a preacher, a prophet, a signpost pointing people in the right direction. We can pray today for all those people who acted as signposts in our lives and brought us closer to God'~Jane Mellett

Last Saturday (June 24th) we celebrated the feast of John the Baptist. The eve of this feast day is marked in Cork with lots of bonfires, even though the connection with the feast day of St. John has largely been forgotten. The feast day of St. John the Baptist also coincides with the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. Long before Christianity took root, people placed great hope in light and that light would always conquer darkness.

John the Baptist was a celebrity in his own way. Thousands flocked to hear him and be baptised by him. But John was not interested in fame. He never wanted to draw attention to himself. John's mission was to prepare the way for Jesus. He was a bit like a grounds man before an important game. He lined the pitch, mowed the grass just right and got everything ready as it should be. Then when the game started he stepped back knowing his job was done. There are many people who quietly work away in a similar way. The work they do is vitally important and often they do not get the praise or attention they deserve.

John wanted to draw attention only to Jesus. Sometimes we hang our heads and often we're not proud of what we believe in. It's almost as if it is unfashionable and a bit embarrassing to say we believe. John was the exact opposite. He had no reservations and no inhibitions in proclaiming that he was proud to be a follower of Jesus. We too are called to hold our heads up. We are called to be proud of what we believe and to be grateful that we have indeed something to build our lives on.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jun-25
Thought For Today is by Jane Mellett from Intercom Magazine

Today's Gospel is an affirmation for all those who feel persecuted in any way because of their beliefs or because people are speaking badly about them, or those who feel alienated from their community, their family or even from God. During such times it can be extremely lonely to the point where one can lose their sense of purpose in this world. While we might not want to shout from the rooftops, as Jesus suggests, there is a message here to speak out, to talk it out.

Today, spend time on the beautiful words of Jesus in this Gospel - 'Even the hairs of your head are all counted, so do not be afraid; you are of more value than many sparrows!' The sparrow, one of the smallest of birds, is cared for and loved by God. This is a reminder that no matter how insignificant we might feel or how challenging the circumstances get, God is with us, each of us. Once again, we are being told how sacred each and every person is and how much we are loved by God. In his eyes, each of us are precious. Today, recall the times or places where you felt God's supporting presence.

'When we travel through those wilderness places of our lives where we feel lost, insecure, lonely, frustrated, discouraged, or overcome by busyness: Help us to trust in you, God of the journey. When we catch glimpses of the tremendous love you have for us and experience a deep, loving connection with others: Help us to trust in you, God of the journey.' Joyce Rupp
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jun-24
'John was a preacher, a prophet, a signpost pointing people in the right direction. We can pray today for all those people who acted as signposts in our lives and brought us closer to God'~Jane Mellett

Today (June 24th) we celebrate the feast of John the Baptist. The eve of this feast day is marked in Cork with lots of bonfires, even though the connection with the feast day of St. John has largely been forgotten. The feast day of St. John the Baptist also coincides with the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. Long before Christianity took root, people placed great hope in light and that light would always conquer darkness.

John the Baptist was a celebrity in his own way. Thousands flocked to hear him and be baptised by him. But John was not interested in fame. He never wanted to draw attention to himself. John's mission was to prepare the way for Jesus. He was a bit like a grounds man before an important game. He lined the pitch, mowed the grass just right and got everything ready as it should be. Then when the game started he stepped back knowing his job was done. There are many people who quietly work away in a similar way. The work they do is vitally important and often they do not get the praise or attention they deserve.

John wanted to draw attention only to Jesus. Sometimes we hang our heads and often we're not proud of what we believe in. It's almost as if it is unfashionable and a bit embarrassing to say we believe. John was the exact opposite. He had no reservations and no inhibitions in proclaiming that he was proud to be a follower of Jesus. We too are called to hold our heads up. We are called to be proud of what we believe and to be grateful that we have indeed something to build our lives on.
 
 
 
  Friday
Jun-23
'May your roots go down deep into the soil of God's marvelous love. May you have the power to understand as all God's people should, how wide, how long, how high and how deep God's love really is.' ~Ephesians 3:17-18

There are many different types of root systems. The deepest roots are generally found in deserts and the deepest observed living root was found to be 60 metres! Some roots can grow as deep as a tree is high. The majority of roots on most plants are however found relatively close to the surface where nutrient availability and aeration are more favourable for growth. The main purpose of a root is that it anchors the plant to the earth and it also collects the water and nutrients necessary for plant growth.

It should come as no surprise that in spirituality the image of a root is often used. Everyone needs some anchor in life, something to hold us in place and something to keep us from falling over. People have tried lots of different things to keep us anchored. But there is nothing more effective or more important than a belief in a loving God, who is a constant anchor.

Last Sunday was the the feast day of Corpus Christi. This feast day celebrates the significance of the Eucharist in our lives. Just as a plant needs water and nutrients, we also need spiritual sustenance on our daily journey. The Eucharist (or Mass as it better known as) gives us spiritual sustenance at key moments of our lives. Again God is the one who can provide the spiritual energy and sustenance to keep us going through all the ups and downs on our daily journey through life. Most of the time we cannot see a root system. God's love can sometimes seem hidden but we are invited today to begin to understand how important, personal and deep God's love is for us. As part of this vital root system we are all included.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jun-22
'May your roots go down deep into the soil of God's marvelous love. May you have the power to understand as all God's people should, how wide, how long, how high and how deep God's love really is.' ~Ephesians 3:17-18

There are many different types of root systems. The deepest roots are generally found in deserts and the deepest observed living root was found to be 60 metres! Some roots can grow as deep as a tree is high. The majority of roots on most plants are however found relatively close to the surface where nutrient availability and aeration are more favourable for growth. The main purpose of a root is that it anchors the plant to the earth and it also collects the water and nutrients necessary for plant growth.

It should come as no surprise that in spirituality the image of a root is often used. Everyone needs some anchor in life, something to hold us in place and something to keep us from falling over. People have tried lots of different things to keep us anchored. But there is nothing more effective or more important than a belief in a loving God, who is a constant anchor.

Last Sunday was the the feast day of Corpus Christi. This feast day celebrates the significance of the Eucharist in our lives. Just as a plant needs water and nutrients, we also need spiritual sustenance on our daily journey. The Eucharist (or Mass as it better known as) gives us spiritual sustenance at key moments of our lives. Again God is the one who can provide the spiritual energy and sustenance to keep us going through all the ups and downs on our daily journey through life. Most of the time we cannot see a root system. God's love can sometimes seem hidden but we are invited today to begin to understand how important, personal and deep God's love is for us. As part of this vital root system we are all included.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jun-21
'May your roots go down deep into the soil of God's marvelous love. May you have the power to understand as all God's people should, how wide, how long, how high and how deep God's love really is.' ~Ephesians 3:17-18

There are many different types of root systems. The deepest roots are generally found in deserts and the deepest observed living root was found to be 60 metres! Some roots can grow as deep as a tree is high. The majority of roots on most plants are however found relatively close to the surface where nutrient availability and aeration are more favourable for growth. The main purpose of a root is that it anchors the plant to the earth and it also collects the water and nutrients necessary for plant growth.

It should come as no surprise that in spirituality the image of a root is often used. Everyone needs some anchor in life, something to hold us in place and something to keep us from falling over. People have tried lots of different things to keep us anchored. But there is nothing more effective or more important than a belief in a loving God, who is a constant anchor.

Last Sunday was the the feast day of Corpus Christi. This feast day celebrates the significance of the Eucharist in our lives. Just as a plant needs water and nutrients, we also need spiritual sustenance on our daily journey. The Eucharist (or Mass as it better known as) gives us spiritual sustenance at key moments of our lives. Again God is the one who can provide the spiritual energy and sustenance to keep us going through all the ups and downs on our daily journey through life. Most of the time we cannot see a root system. God's love can sometimes seem hidden but we are invited today to begin to understand how important, personal and deep God's love is for us. As part of this vital root system we are all included.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jun-20
'May your roots go down deep into the soil of God's marvelous love. May you have the power to understand as all God's people should, how wide, how long, how high and how deep God's love really is.' ~Ephesians 3:17-18

There are many different types of root systems. The deepest roots are generally found in deserts and the deepest observed living root was found to be 60 metres! Some roots can grow as deep as a tree is high. The majority of roots on most plants are however found relatively close to the surface where nutrient availability and aeration are more favourable for growth. The main purpose of a root is that it anchors the plant to the earth and it also collects the water and nutrients necessary for plant growth.

It should come as no surprise that in spirituality the image of a root is often used. Everyone needs some anchor in life, something to hold us in place and something to keep us from falling over. People have tried lots of different things to keep us anchored. But there is nothing more effective or more important than a belief in a loving God, who is a constant anchor.

Last Sunday was the the feast day of Corpus Christi. This feast day celebrates the significance of the Eucharist in our lives. Just as a plant needs water and nutrients, we also need spiritual sustenance on our daily journey. The Eucharist (or Mass as it better known as) gives us spiritual sustenance at key moments of our lives. Again God is the one who can provide the spiritual energy and sustenance to keep us going through all the ups and downs on our daily journey through life. Most of the time we cannot see a root system. God's love can sometimes seem hidden but we are invited today to begin to understand how important, personal and deep God's love is for us. As part of this vital root system we are all included.
 
 
 
  Monday
Jun-19
'May your roots go down deep into the soil of God's marvelous love. May you have the power to understand as all God's people should, how wide, how long, how high and how deep God's love really is.' ~Ephesians 3:17-18

There are many different types of root systems. The deepest roots are generally found in deserts and the deepest observed living root was found to be 60 metres! Some roots can grow as deep as a tree is high. The majority of roots on most plants are however found relatively close to the surface where nutrient availability and aeration are more favourable for growth. The main purpose of a root is that it anchors the plant to the earth and it also collects the water and nutrients necessary for plant growth.

It should come as no surprise that in spirituality the image of a root is often used. Everyone needs some anchor in life, something to hold us in place and something to keep us from falling over. People have tried lots of different things to keep us anchored. But there is nothing more effective or more important than a belief in a loving God, who is a constant anchor.

Yesterday was the the feast day of Corpus Christi. This feast day celebrates the significance of the Eucharist in our lives. Just as a plant needs water and nutrients, we also need spiritual sustenance on our daily journey. The Eucharist (or Mass as it better known as) gives us spiritual sustenance at key moments of our lives. Again God is the one who can provide the spiritual energy and sustenance to keep us going through all the ups and downs on our daily journey through life. Most of the time we cannot see a root system. God's love can sometimes seem hidden but we are invited today to begin to understand how important, personal and deep God's love is for us. As part of this vital root system we are all included.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jun-18
Our Thought For Today is by Jane Mellett called 'The Bread Of Life' from the Intercom magazine.

Jesus gives his whole self to us and invites us to a deep union with him. We often imagine God up in the clouds in heaven looking down at us, maybe distant, maybe disconnected. The Eucharist shows us that God is involved in the messiness of human life, present to us in Jesus' body and blood. Bread is nourishing, bread is for life, bread is food for the journey. Jesus is all of these things for us. His blood is a reminder of his death, of the brokenness of this world, of the struggles of people's lives. Christ invites people to connect their own sufferings with his.

Jesus, present with us in all of life, invites us into a deep union with himself. Flesh and blood means the whole person; 'the living bread' invites us to an even deeper intimacy. It can be a difficult passage to understand, but perhaps today you might reflect on times you felt sustained by God, strengthened by God through joyful times and sorrowful times. You might also reflect on who has been Jesus for you? Where have you seen Christ in this world, in flesh and blood?
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jun-17
Thought For The Week

Trinity Sunday: we don't celebrate a puzzle, but we do pay homage to a mystery. Puzzles get solved, mysteries don't. They're not for solving. The more you delve into a mystery the more you realise there is to delve into. Thus it is with that mystery we so abstractedly call: the Most Holy Trinity. ~Tom Cahill

In school I have 3 boxes of jigsaws and I sometimes take them to the Prayer Room and lay them out on the floor. One is 1000 pieces, the next one is 100 and the third one is 20 pieces. I explain to the students that each pile of jigsaw pieces can stand for a typical day that we go through.

Some days are like the 20 pieces jigsaw, easy to put together, big pieces and everything fits just grand.
Some days are like the the 100 piece jigsaw, harder to put together, more pieces and these days can be challenging and sometimes difficult.
Then some days are nearly impossible, like the 1000 piece jigsaw. There are so many tiny pieces and all look so alike. Such days are hard to make sense of and can be very challenging too.
So whether our life at the moment feels like a 20 pieces jigsaw, a 100 piece jigsaw or a 1000 piece jigsaw, God is somewhere in there too helping us put together the different pieces as best we can.

So if we then add the word mystery (which is at the heart of the feast of the Holy Trinity) what might that mean? It is like emptying thousands and thousands of different jigsaws, mixing them all together and then trying to put them all together. It is nearly an impossible task. It is also nearly an impossible task to say we know everything about God because we don't.

But there are a few things we know very well and mainly that God is love. The Holy Trinity speaks of a God who knows our story, our difficulties, our heartaches, our weaknesses, our disappointments and so much more. Scriptures have many references, speaking about God as a God of tenderness, full of compassion, rich in faithfulness and kindness. This is just one piece of the jigsaw. There are so many more.

The invitation is to hold whatever pieces of the jigsaw about God that we like and are comfortable with. We can't hold all the pieces and no one can either. But the ones we have we will treasure knowing they do make a difference in our lives.
 
 
 
  Friday
Jun-16
Thought For The Week

Trinity Sunday: we don't celebrate a puzzle, but we do pay homage to a mystery. Puzzles get solved, mysteries don't. They're not for solving. The more you delve into a mystery the more you realise there is to delve into. Thus it is with that mystery we so abstractedly call: the Most Holy Trinity. ~Tom Cahill

In school I have 3 boxes of jigsaws and I sometimes take them to the Prayer Room and lay them out on the floor. One is 1000 pieces, the next one is 100 and the third one is 20 pieces. I explain to the students that each pile of jigsaw pieces can stand for a typical day that we go through.

Some days are like the 20 pieces jigsaw, easy to put together, big pieces and everything fits just grand.
Some days are like the the 100 piece jigsaw, harder to put together, more pieces and these days can be challenging and sometimes difficult.
Then some days are nearly impossible, like the 1000 piece jigsaw. There are so many tiny pieces and all look so alike. Such days are hard to make sense of and can be very challenging too.
So whether our life at the moment feels like a 20 pieces jigsaw, a 100 piece jigsaw or a 1000 piece jigsaw, God is somewhere in there too helping us put together the different pieces as best we can.

So if we then add the word mystery (which is at the heart of the feast of the Holy Trinity) what might that mean? It is like emptying thousands and thousands of different jigsaws, mixing them all together and then trying to put them all together. It is nearly an impossible task. It is also nearly an impossible task to say we know everything about God because we don't.

But there are a few things we know very well and mainly that God is love. The Holy Trinity speaks of a God who knows our story, our difficulties, our heartaches, our weaknesses, our disappointments and so much more. Scriptures have many references, speaking about God as a God of tenderness, full of compassion, rich in faithfulness and kindness. This is just one piece of the jigsaw. There are so many more.

The invitation is to hold whatever pieces of the jigsaw about God that we like and are comfortable with. We can't hold all the pieces and no one can either. But the ones we have we will treasure knowing they do make a difference in our lives.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jun-15
Thought For The Week

Trinity Sunday: we don't celebrate a puzzle, but we do pay homage to a mystery. Puzzles get solved, mysteries don't. They're not for solving. The more you delve into a mystery the more you realise there is to delve into. Thus it is with that mystery we so abstractedly call: the Most Holy Trinity. ~Tom Cahill

In school I have 3 boxes of jigsaws and I sometimes take them to the Prayer Room and lay them out on the floor. One is 1000 pieces, the next one is 100 and the third one is 20 pieces. I explain to the students that each pile of jigsaw pieces can stand for a typical day that we go through.

Some days are like the 20 pieces jigsaw, easy to put together, big pieces and everything fits just grand.
Some days are like the the 100 piece jigsaw, harder to put together, more pieces and these days can be challenging and sometimes difficult.
Then some days are nearly impossible, like the 1000 piece jigsaw. There are so many tiny pieces and all look so alike. Such days are hard to make sense of and can be very challenging too.
So whether our life at the moment feels like a 20 pieces jigsaw, a 100 piece jigsaw or a 1000 piece jigsaw, God is somewhere in there too helping us put together the different pieces as best we can.

So if we then add the word mystery (which is at the heart of the feast of the Holy Trinity) what might that mean? It is like emptying thousands and thousands of different jigsaws, mixing them all together and then trying to put them all together. It is nearly an impossible task. It is also nearly an impossible task to say we know everything about God because we don't.

But there are a few things we know very well and mainly that God is love. The Holy Trinity speaks of a God who knows our story, our difficulties, our heartaches, our weaknesses, our disappointments and so much more. Scriptures have many references, speaking about God as a God of tenderness, full of compassion, rich in faithfulness and kindness. This is just one piece of the jigsaw. There are so many more.

The invitation is to hold whatever pieces of the jigsaw about God that we like and are comfortable with. We can't hold all the pieces and no one can either. But the ones we have we will treasure knowing they do make a difference in our lives.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jun-14
Thought For The Week

Trinity Sunday: we don't celebrate a puzzle, but we do pay homage to a mystery. Puzzles get solved, mysteries don't. They're not for solving. The more you delve into a mystery the more you realise there is to delve into. Thus it is with that mystery we so abstractedly call: the Most Holy Trinity. ~Tom Cahill

In school I have 3 boxes of jigsaws and I sometimes take them to the Prayer Room and lay them out on the floor. One is 1000 pieces, the next one is 100 and the third one is 20 pieces. I explain to the students that each pile of jigsaw pieces can stand for a typical day that we go through.

Some days are like the 20 pieces jigsaw, easy to put together, big pieces and everything fits just grand.
Some days are like the the 100 piece jigsaw, harder to put together, more pieces and these days can be challenging and sometimes difficult.
Then some days are nearly impossible, like the 1000 piece jigsaw. There are so many tiny pieces and all look so alike. Such days are hard to make sense of and can be very challenging too.
So whether our life at the moment feels like a 20 pieces jigsaw, a 100 piece jigsaw or a 1000 piece jigsaw, God is somewhere in there too helping us put together the different pieces as best we can.

So if we then add the word mystery (which is at the heart of the feast of the Holy Trinity) what might that mean? It is like emptying thousands and thousands of different jigsaws, mixing them all together and then trying to put them all together. It is nearly an impossible task. It is also nearly an impossible task to say we know everything about God because we don't.

But there are a few things we know very well and mainly that God is love. The Holy Trinity speaks of a God who knows our story, our difficulties, our heartaches, our weaknesses, our disappointments and so much more. Scriptures have many references, speaking about God as a God of tenderness, full of compassion, rich in faithfulness and kindness. This is just one piece of the jigsaw. There are so many more.

The invitation is to hold whatever pieces of the jigsaw about God that we like and are comfortable with. We can't hold all the pieces and no one can either. But the ones we have we will treasure knowing they do make a difference in our lives.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jun-13
Today June 13th is the feast day of St Anthony. He has great appeal for those whose lives feel uprooted and who are searching for new directions in life. He turned his life completely over to God and the Gospel call to leave everything and follow Christ. This was the rule of his life.

He was the first friar to teach theology to other friars. He had a profound knowledge of Scripture and Theology which he used to convert and reassure those who had been misled or gone astray. He has many admirers today. There is huge popular devotion to him as he is nominated as finder of lost objects. This came about through his own life, losing himself totally to the providence of God. The Lily flower is also closely associated with St Anthony. We ask his many blessings on us today.
 
 
 
  Monday
Jun-12
Thought For Week will be up tomorrow Tuesday
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jun-11
Thought For Today by Jane Mellett on Trinity Sunday from Intercom Magazine

'God has fallen in love with us - quite literally. God has come down to earth, and opened Godself to all the raw brutality, as well as the warm tenderness, of human life.' ~Margaret Silf

God in today's Gospel is described to us as one that is very close, as one that loves the world so deeply that he was willing to give everything to it. It is hard to comprehend these statements. Why would someone love in such a way? Why would someone sacrifice in such a way? John's Gospel today tells us that it is because we are loved so deeply and so that we would come to know this love which brings life. It is not a one-off event; it is continuous and ongoing in each of our lives. Neither is it to make us feel guilty; we are told that this outpouring of God's love is not to condemn us in any way. This giving from the Father is so that we might be free from our own brokenness, that we might know how infinitely loved we are and so live a life that is full and everlasting. God rescues us from our own brokenness and offers a life that is a fuller and deeper experience.

Trinity Sunday invites us to reflect on the impossible; on the utterly mysterious. Yet we can know something of what it means to experience God's love in our lives; to have a deep relationship with Jesus Christ and to feel God's Spirit dwelling within ourselves. We can experience that same Spirit in each person that we meet, that Spirit of God indwelling in all of creation. The Trinity speaks to us of relationship, community, of fully giving and receiving.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jun-10
Thought For The Week

'The Spirit is the Spirit of God reaching our human spirit, giving us energy in the life of our faith and in our desire to do our best in life. Alone we can do little, together we can grow strong and with the Spirit of God we can create joy and peace together.' ~Donal Neary

We have all seen the clip at the start of the weather report on RTE, of a man on holidays in a sunny resort. He hears the weather isn't great at home with lots of rain and he shouts: "It's miserable back home." He takes great delight in making sure the word 'miserable' is loud and clear. He is delighted and wants to take a selfie of himself in the sun and send this back home! The word miserable can be used in lots of different ways but it can never be used to describe the Spirit of God. The word miserable just doesn't apply, there is no traction there and it is alien to the concept of what the Spirit of God might mean.

The opposite of miserable is joy, peace love and happiness and this is the energy of God. The Spirit of God is everywhere; it is uplifting, bright, enriching, inspirational, positive, kind, generous, full of love, inclusive, respectful and knows no limits. This energy is never static but always changing and renewing itself.

The feast of Pentecost celebrated at the weekend is a wonderful celebration of the Spirit of God. The Spirit of the God or The Holy Spirit is the greatest energy or presence in our world. It is alive, active, creative and prompting us always to God's special presence in our world.

As soon as a yacht lifts up its sails to catch a breeze it becomes alive and moves through water full with purpose, energy and delight. If the sail is taken down and put away the yacht is almost lifeless and just drifts along. With regard to the Holy Spirit we have sometimes forgotten to put up our sails to catch and harness a unique presence in our world today. The invitation on Pentecost Sunday is to put up the sails up and feel the difference.
 
 
 
  Friday
Jun-09
Thought For The Week

'The Spirit is the Spirit of God reaching our human spirit, giving us energy in the life of our faith and in our desire to do our best in life. Alone we can do little, together we can grow strong and with the Spirit of God we can create joy and peace together.' ~Donal Neary

We have all seen the clip at the start of the weather report on RTE, of a man on holidays in a sunny resort. He hears the weather isn't great at home with lots of rain and he shouts: "It's miserable back home." He takes great delight in making sure the word 'miserable' is loud and clear. He is delighted and wants to take a selfie of himself in the sun and send this back home! The word miserable can be used in lots of different ways but it can never be used to describe the Spirit of God. The word miserable just doesn't apply, there is no traction there and it is alien to the concept of what the Spirit of God might mean.

The opposite of miserable is joy, peace love and happiness and this is the energy of God. The Spirit of God is everywhere; it is uplifting, bright, enriching, inspirational, positive, kind, generous, full of love, inclusive, respectful and knows no limits. This energy is never static but always changing and renewing itself.

The feast of Pentecost celebrated at the weekend is a wonderful celebration of the Spirit of God. The Spirit of the God or The Holy Spirit is the greatest energy or presence in our world. It is alive, active, creative and prompting us always to God's special presence in our world.

As soon as a yacht lifts up its sails to catch a breeze it becomes alive and moves through water full with purpose, energy and delight. If the sail is taken down and put away the yacht is almost lifeless and just drifts along. With regard to the Holy Spirit we have sometimes forgotten to put up our sails to catch and harness a unique presence in our world today. The invitation on Pentecost Sunday is to put up the sails up and feel the difference.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jun-07
Thought For The Week

'The Spirit is the Spirit of God reaching our human spirit, giving us energy in the life of our faith and in our desire to do our best in life. Alone we can do little, together we can grow strong and with the Spirit of God we can create joy and peace together.' ~Donal Neary

We have all seen the clip at the start of the weather report on RTE, of a man on holidays in a sunny resort. He hears the weather isn't great at home with lots of rain and he shouts: "It's miserable back home." He takes great delight in making sure the word 'miserable' is loud and clear. He is delighted and wants to take a selfie of himself in the sun and send this back home! The word miserable can be used in lots of different ways but it can never be used to describe the Spirit of God. The word miserable just doesn't apply, there is no traction there and it is alien to the concept of what the Spirit of God might mean.

The opposite of miserable is joy, peace love and happiness and this is the energy of God. The Spirit of God is everywhere; it is uplifting, bright, enriching, inspirational, positive, kind, generous, full of love, inclusive, respectful and knows no limits. This energy is never static but always changing and renewing itself.

The feast of Pentecost celebrated at the weekend is a wonderful celebration of the Spirit of God. The Spirit of the God or The Holy Spirit is the greatest energy or presence in our world. It is alive, active, creative and prompting us always to God's special presence in our world.

As soon as a yacht lifts up its sails to catch a breeze it becomes alive and moves through water full with purpose, energy and delight. If the sail is taken down and put away the yacht is almost lifeless and just drifts along. With regard to the Holy Spirit we have sometimes forgotten to put up our sails to catch and harness a unique presence in our world today. The invitation on Pentecost Sunday is to put up the sails up and feel the difference.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jun-06
Thought For The Week

'The Spirit is the Spirit of God reaching our human spirit, giving us energy in the life of our faith and in our desire to do our best in life. Alone we can do little, together we can grow strong and with the Spirit of God we can create joy and peace together.' ~Donal Neary

We have all seen the clip at the start of the weather report on RTE, of a man on holidays in a sunny resort. He hears the weather isn't great at home with lots of rain and he shouts: "It's miserable back home." He takes great delight in making sure the word 'miserable' is loud and clear. He is delighted and wants to take a selfie of himself in the sun and send this back home! The word miserable can be used in lots of different ways but it can never be used to describe the Spirit of God. The word miserable just doesn't apply, there is no traction there and it is alien to the concept of what the Spirit of God might mean.

The opposite of miserable is joy, peace love and happiness and this is the energy of God. The Spirit of God is everywhere; it is uplifting, bright, enriching, inspirational, positive, kind, generous, full of love, inclusive, respectful and knows no limits. This energy is never static but always changing and renewing itself.

The feast of Pentecost celebrated yesterday is a wonderful celebration of the Spirit of God. The Spirit of the God or The Holy Spirit is the greatest energy or presence in our world. It is alive, active, creative and prompting us always to God's special presence in our world.

As soon as a yacht lifts up its sails to catch a breeze it becomes alive and moves through water full with purpose, energy and delight. If the sail is taken down and put away the yacht is almost lifeless and just drifts along. With regard to the Holy Spirit we have sometimes forgotten to put up our sails to catch and harness a unique presence in our world today. The invitation on Pentecost Sunday is to put up the sails up and feel the difference.
 
 
 
  Monday
Jun-05
Thought For The Week

'The Spirit is the Spirit of God reaching our human spirit, giving us energy in the life of our faith and in our desire to do our best in life. Alone we can do little, together we can grow strong and with the Spirit of God we can create joy and peace together.' ~Donal Neary

We have all seen the clip at the start of the weather report on RTE, of a man on holidays in a sunny resort. He hears the weather isn't great at home with lots of rain and he shouts: "It's miserable back home." He takes great delight in making sure the word 'miserable' is loud and clear. He is delighted and wants to take a selfie of himself in the sun and send this back home! The word miserable can be used in lots of different ways but it can never be used to describe the Spirit of God. The word miserable just doesn't apply, there is no traction there and it is alien to the concept of what the Spirit of God might mean.

The opposite of miserable is joy, peace love and happiness and this is the energy of God. The Spirit of God is everywhere; it is uplifting, bright, enriching, inspirational, positive, kind, generous, full of love, inclusive, respectful and knows no limits. This energy is never static but always changing and renewing itself.

The feast of Pentecost celebrated yesterday is a wonderful celebration of the Spirit of God. The Spirit of the God or The Holy Spirit is the greatest energy or presence in our world. It is alive, active, creative and prompting us always to God's special presence in our world.

As soon as a yacht lifts up its sails to catch a breeze it becomes alive and moves through water full with purpose, energy and delight. If the sail is taken down and put away the yacht is almost lifeless and just drifts along. With regard to the Holy Spirit we have sometimes forgotten to put up our sails to catch and harness a unique presence in our world today. The invitation on Pentecost Sunday is to put up the sails up and feel the difference.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jun-04
Thought For Today by Jane Mellett called 'Shalom'

'When we understand the essential unity of all that is, we discover the possibility of "peace" - the king of peace that in Hebrew is called, Shalom, which is infinitely more than an absence of strife; it is the wholeness of the web of life itself and of every creature in it, held in the wholeness of the one God.' ~Margaret Silf

The disciples in today's Gospel are locked away, living in fear. There are many situations in our own lives which cause us to batten down the hatches. We can often imprison ourselves. Jesus appears amongst them bringing peace, Shalom, and overcoming their defences. Christ is always present to us regardless of the walls we might put up; he offers peace, joy and reconciliation. The word 'Shalom' is more than a wish for a good evening; it means that your wish for the person is a peace of body, mind and spirit. It is a holistic peace. Jesus gives this peace to the disciples and breathes his Spirit upon them. This enables them; this gives them courage; this sends them out. Jesus still bears the wounds of the crucifixion, reminding us that our wounds are part of who we are; we carry them with us.

We might ask ourselves today who it is that we need to be reconciled with? What fears do we need liberating from? Into what situations do we send Christ's peace? Jesus is asking the disciples to be an unending witness to God's love. They (and we) must be for others what Jesus has been for them.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jun-03
Last week Graduation Ceremonies took place in many secondary schools across Ireland. The following reflection called 'Promise Yourself' was read at Coláiste Pobail Bheanntraí (Bantry Community College) on Thursday evening

Promise Yourself

Promise yourself to be comfortable and at ease in what you really believe in.
Promise yourself to make all your friends feel that they are worthwhile and special.
Promise yourself to think only the best, to work only for the best and to expect only the best.
Promise yourself to be just as enthusiastic about the success of others as you are about your own.
Promise yourself to learn from the mistakes of the past and to welcome the blessings of today.
Promise yourself to be as upbeat as you can and to give a smile whenever you can.
Promise yourself to be generous with your time and to spend less time wrapped up in criticism or negativity.
And finally promise to be proud of who you are, to let no one take away what is special to you and to always let your light shine.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jun-01
Last week Graduation Ceremonies took place in many secondary schools across Ireland. The following reflection called 'Promise Yourself' was read at Col"iste Pobail Bheanntra" (Bantry Community College) on Thursday evening

Promise Yourself

Promise yourself to be comfortable and at ease in what you really believe in.
Promise yourself to make all your friends feel that they are worthwhile and special.
Promise yourself to think only the best, to work only for the best and to expect only the best.
Promise yourself to be just as enthusiastic about the success of others as you are about your own.
Promise yourself to learn from the mistakes of the past and to welcome the blessings of today.
Promise yourself to be as upbeat as you can and to give a smile whenever you can.
Promise yourself to be generous with your time and to spend less time wrapped up in criticism or negativity.
And finally promise to be proud of who you are, to let no one take away what is special to you and to always let your light shine.
 
 

 

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