Saint of tooday
Tell a Friend
*
Feedback / Queries
*
Add to Favorites
*
Set as Homepage
*
Join Us On Facebook
Home About Site About Photographer Photo Archive Thought Archive  
LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

  January
  February
  March
  April
  May

  2012
  2011
  2010
  2009
  2007
  2008
  2013
  2014
  2015
  2016
  2017
  2018
  2019
  2020
  2021
  2022

 

 

Listing May - 2022
 
  Wednesday
May-18
Did you know....

The adult human body has 206 bones. An infant may have from 300-350 bones at birth. Some of these will fuse together as the child grows and so with years the number of overall bones will drop to 206. Of these 206 bones more than half (103) are in the hands and feet. The longest bone in your body is the femur (thigh bone) and is a quarter of your height.

The smallest is in the ear called the stirrup. Humans and giraffes have the same number of bones in their necks. It has been said that all our bones could be narrowed down to three to get us through life. We need a wishbone to dream with, a backbone for the courage to get through the hard times and a funny bone to laugh at life along the way!
 
 
 
  Tuesday
May-17
Thought For The Week

To lift up the hands in prayer gives God glory, but a man with a dung-fork in his hands or a woman with a slop basin give God glory too. God is so great that all things give glory to God if you mean they should.' ~Gerard Manley Hopkins

Hopkins (1844-1889) was considered an early modern poet ahead of his time. His poetry is notable for his use of sprung rhythm and intricate use of language and rhyme. He was also a Jesuit priest and was very much in touch with the presence of God in everything around him.

We have so many beautiful churches, cathedrals and places of worship. Many find it easier to make a connection with God when they gather to pray in such places.

But connecting with God in church is never exclusive or the best way or the only way. Gerard Manley Hopkins felt that we can connect with God no matter who we are, wherever we are and whenever we want. If this means it is in the middle of a dirty job or maybe not the nicest job in the world then so be it. God doesn't mind. It is we who have created the obstacles and the barriers.

Today is a good day to know that we can find God whenever and wherever we want. God is most certainly not into perfection or a perfect prayer. It is good to start where you are and with what you are doing. Throughout these weeks of Easter we are reminded of the incredible love that God has for each of us. These weeks are good to get a sense of this love. It is foundation on which many of our lives depend. Sometimes we take it for granted but certainly not so during the season of Easter.
 
 
 
  Monday
May-16
Thought For The Week

'Now I am revealing new things to you, things hidden and unknown to you, created just now. This very moment you have heard nothing of these things until now, so that you cannot say, 'Oh yes, I knew all this'. ~Isaiah 48:6

We sometimes think of God, religion and spirituality as just static. Some see it as created in the past which has been passed onto us to preserve and in turn we pass it on to someone else. This is very limiting. Everything about God is fresh, moving and changing. Nothing stays still. Even the prophet Isaiah who wrote many thousands of years ago, had a lovely sense of everything evolving and changing.

This month of May is an example of how everything in nature is changing. Everything is now bursting with life, colour and energy. Our gardens are equally bursting with life and colour. It is a month of expansion and growth.

The same goes with God who is never static. We can never say we know God fully or know with certainty the answers to our deepest questions. Each day we can learn something new about ourselves, about God, about life, about the world we live in, about our family, our friends and so on.

All of them are never in isolation but are connected in a mysterious web that make up today. If we believe that today is God's gift to us then we are open to possibility, freshness and a sense of freedom in our lives. That's why today is always precious and a day to make the most of, as best we can.
 
 
 
  Sunday
May-15
'Sit on a stone for three years and it gets warm' ~Japanese Proverb

A proverb is a simple and concrete saying popularly known and repeated. It expresses a truth based on common sense. The book of proverbs found in the Bible is one of the best collection of proverbs known but every culture has examples of its own. Many Japanese proverbs are usually very short and to the point. They also echo the scriptures.

The above proverb is a reminder on the importance of perseverance. It is often so easy to give up, to not bother or care, to leave it to someone else and to give up when the challenges get serious. But most good things in life take time. While sitting on a stone for three years seems like an awful long time, the key message here is that all the really good things in life need quality time. We are pulled and dragged in how we spend and use this time. We are encouraged to persevere, to keep going, to do our best, to use our time wisely and to know that everything will work out for the best. We are also encouraged throughout scriptures to put our trust in God who will always persevere with us to get us where we want.
 
 
 
  Saturday
May-14
'People are always blaming circumstances for what they are. I do not believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want and if they cannot find them, make them.' ~George Bernard Shaw

It is easy to blame our circumstances and how if they had been different, so much else would have been different. As it happens many of our circumstances are often outside our control but not always. Circumstances can change, they do change and often for the better. Sometimes we have to make them happen. If we wait and hope that they might change, we are in for a long wait. So a change in our circumstances starts with us and especially today. Also at the heart of what we believe in, is how God is with us no matter what our circumstances. We pray today for guidance, direction and help in whatever our circumstances may be.
 
 
 
  Friday
May-13
 
 
 
  Friday
May-13
'There's a disappointment and anger inside every one of us and unless we find it in ourselves to forgive, we will be bitter.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

The constant invitation throughout the Gospel stories is to allow life help us to become a better person and not a bitter person. It is very much at the heart of the story of Easter as well. It would seem that as we become older we can become more increasingly resentful.

That is why Jesus said we must become like little children. They have no hidden agendas and do not carry the resentments and hurts we tend to carry. At times a needle of resentment can get stuck in the record of our lives and it keeps churning out the same old story. This story is always negative, critical and sarcastic. It drains us of vital energy and long term it is never good for our health. All the good and positive moments that make up our day simply get lost in this.

Joan Chittister described it as an "acid that is poured on our souls eating away our peace within." It has often been said God loves the sinner but not the sin. Forgiveness allows us to let go of the resentment and begin to get on with our lives. What do you need to let go of in your life? Can you begin to let go some resentment?

Last Sunday was the Fourth Sunday of Easter and has traditionally been called 'Vocations Sunday'. The following prayer has been put together to mark the day. Loving God, at baptism you have gifted each of us with a call to serve you and all people in everything we do. Give us the strength to share your message of love, justice, hope and peace. We ask you, Lord, for the gift of new vocations to priesthood in our Diocese. In your loving care, accompany those who are seeking to know your will for them. Inspire those you invite to serve as priests and fill them with the courage to answer that call. Through Christ Our Lord. Amen.
 
 
 
  Thursday
May-12
'There's a disappointment and anger inside every one of us and unless we find it in ourselves to forgive, we will be bitter.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

The constant invitation throughout the Gospel stories is to allow life help us to become a better person and not a bitter person. It is very much at the heart of the story of Easter as well. It would seem that as we become older we can become more increasingly resentful.

That is why Jesus said we must become like little children. They have no hidden agendas and do not carry the resentments and hurts we tend to carry. At times a needle of resentment can get stuck in the record of our lives and it keeps churning out the same old story. This story is always negative, critical and sarcastic. It drains us of vital energy and long term it is never good for our health. All the good and positive moments that make up our day simply get lost in this.

Joan Chittister described it as an "acid that is poured on our souls eating away our peace within." It has often been said God loves the sinner but not the sin. Forgiveness allows us to let go of the resentment and begin to get on with our lives. What do you need to let go of in your life? Can you begin to let go some resentment?

Last Sunday was the Fourth Sunday of Easter and has traditionally been called 'Vocations Sunday'. The following prayer has been put together to mark the day. Loving God, at baptism you have gifted each of us with a call to serve you and all people in everything we do. Give us the strength to share your message of love, justice, hope and peace. We ask you, Lord, for the gift of new vocations to priesthood in our Diocese. In your loving care, accompany those who are seeking to know your will for them. Inspire those you invite to serve as priests and fill them with the courage to answer that call. Through Christ Our Lord. Amen.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
May-11
'There's a disappointment and anger inside every one of us and unless we find it in ourselves to forgive, we will be bitter.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

The constant invitation throughout the Gospel stories is to allow life help us to become a better person and not a bitter person. It is very much at the heart of the story of Easter as well. It would seem that as we become older we can become more increasingly resentful.

That is why Jesus said we must become like little children. They have no hidden agendas and do not carry the resentments and hurts we tend to carry. At times a needle of resentment can get stuck in the record of our lives and it keeps churning out the same old story. This story is always negative, critical and sarcastic. It drains us of vital energy and long term it is never good for our health. All the good and positive moments that make up our day simply get lost in this.

Joan Chittister described it as an "acid that is poured on our souls eating away our peace within." It has often been said God loves the sinner but not the sin. Forgiveness allows us to let go of the resentment and begin to get on with our lives. What do you need to let go of in your life? Can you begin to let go some resentment?

Last Sunday was the Fourth Sunday of Easter and has traditionally been called 'Vocations Sunday'. The following prayer has been put together to mark the day. Loving God, at baptism you have gifted each of us with a call to serve you and all people in everything we do. Give us the strength to share your message of love, justice, hope and peace. We ask you, Lord, for the gift of new vocations to priesthood in our Diocese. In your loving care, accompany those who are seeking to know your will for them. Inspire those you invite to serve as priests and fill them with the courage to answer that call. Through Christ Our Lord. Amen.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
May-10
'There's a disappointment and anger inside every one of us and unless we find it in ourselves to forgive, we will be bitter.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

The constant invitation throughout the Gospel stories is to allow life help us to become a better person and not a bitter person. It is very much at the heart of the story of Easter as well. It would seem that as we become older we can become more increasingly resentful.

That is why Jesus said we must become like little children. They have no hidden agendas and do not carry the resentments and hurts we tend to carry. At times a needle of resentment can get stuck in the record of our lives and it keeps churning out the same old story. This story is always negative, critical and sarcastic. It drains us of vital energy and long term it is never good for our health. All the good and positive moments that make up our day simply get lost in this.

Joan Chittister described it as an "acid that is poured on our souls eating away our peace within." It has often been said God loves the sinner but not the sin. Forgiveness allows us to let go of the resentment and begin to get on with our lives. What do you need to let go of in your life? Can you begin to let go some resentment?

Yesterday was the Fourth Sunday of Easter and has traditionally been called 'Vocations Sunday'. The following prayer has been put together to mark the day. Loving God, at baptism you have gifted each of us with a call to serve you and all people in everything we do. Give us the strength to share your message of love, justice, hope and peace. We ask you, Lord, for the gift of new vocations to priesthood in our Diocese. In your loving care, accompany those who are seeking to know your will for them. Inspire those you invite to serve as priests and fill them with the courage to answer that call. Through Christ Our Lord. Amen.
 
 
 
  Monday
May-09
'There's a disappointment and anger inside every one of us and unless we find it in ourselves to forgive, we will be bitter.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

The constant invitation throughout the Gospel stories is to allow life help us to become a better person and not a bitter person. It is very much at the heart of the story of Easter as well. It would seem that as we become older we can become more increasingly resentful.

That is why Jesus said we must become like little children. They have no hidden agendas and do not carry the resentments and hurts we tend to carry. At times a needle of resentment can get stuck in the record of our lives and it keeps churning out the same old story. This story is always negative, critical and sarcastic. It drains us of vital energy and long term it is never good for our health. All the good and positive moments that make up our day simply get lost in this.

Joan Chittister described it as an "acid that is poured on our souls eating away our peace within." It has often been said God loves the sinner but not the sin. Forgiveness allows us to let go of the resentment and begin to get on with our lives. What do you need to let go of in your life? Can you begin to let go some resentment?

Yesterday was the Fourth Sunday of Easter and has traditionally been called 'Vocations Sunday'. The following prayer has been put together to mark the day. Loving God, at baptism you have gifted each of us with a call to serve you and all people in everything we do. Give us the strength to share your message of love, justice, hope and peace. We ask you, Lord, for the gift of new vocations to priesthood in our Diocese. In your loving care, accompany those who are seeking to know your will for them. Inspire those you invite to serve as priests and fill them with the courage to answer that call. Through Christ Our Lord. Amen.
 
 
 
  Sunday
May-08
'They say a person needs just three things to be really happy in this world, someone to love, something to do and something to hope for.' ~Tom Bodett

Sunday (May 1st) was 'La Bealtaine' which translates as May Day. La Bealtaine is a day that goes way back many generations in Irish culture and history. Our ancient and recent farming ancestors relied on significant calendar events to give them reassurance and to remind them when to sow and when to reap. They were very in touch with the rhythms of the seasons, the cycles of the moon and the flow of the seasons.

Our modern world has lost touch with much of these natural connections to earth and what connects us to everything. Bealtaine is one of the four major Irish Celtic annual festivals along with Samhain, Imbolc and Lughnasa. It signifies the return of light and is widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, while May Day celebrations occur throughout Europe.

La Bealtaine was celebrated to mark the beginning of summer. It was a day when the herds of livestock were driven out to summer pastures. The lighting of bonfires on hills and mountains was a part of the tradition. Many farmers still have the lovley tradition of sprinkling holy water on their cattle and farms. At the heart of Bealtaine is a reminder of growth, abundance and life flourishing at this time of year. Summer is a season of energy and fulfillment. The darkness of winter is far behind, the promise of spring has delivered and the coming months are about making the most of everything connected with life.

This week just gone all our trees have come into leaf with a great energy and I have already spotted swallows flying around. La Bealtaine is a day of hope and a reminder that summer is here. It is a day of great blessing and we ask God to help us make the most of everything connected with life this summer. Perhaps this weekend, we could put our phone or laptop away and get out for a walk in nature or somewhere outdoors. When we connect with nature it has a calming and healing effect and it is a place where we can also feel close to God too.
 
 
 
  Saturday
May-07
'They say a person needs just three things to be really happy in this world, someone to love, something to do and something to hope for.' ~Tom Bodett

Sunday (May 1st) was 'La Bealtaine' which translates as May Day. La Bealtaine is a day that goes way back many generations in Irish culture and history. Our ancient and recent farming ancestors relied on significant calendar events to give them reassurance and to remind them when to sow and when to reap. They were very in touch with the rhythms of the seasons, the cycles of the moon and the flow of the seasons.

Our modern world has lost touch with much of these natural connections to earth and what connects us to everything. Bealtaine is one of the four major Irish Celtic annual festivals along with Samhain, Imbolc and Lughnasa. It signifies the return of light and is widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, while May Day celebrations occur throughout Europe.

La Bealtaine was celebrated to mark the beginning of summer. It was a day when the herds of livestock were driven out to summer pastures. The lighting of bonfires on hills and mountains was a part of the tradition. Many farmers still have the lovley tradition of sprinkling holy water on their cattle and farms. At the heart of Bealtaine is a reminder of growth, abundance and life flourishing at this time of year. Summer is a season of energy and fulfillment. The darkness of winter is far behind, the promise of spring has delivered and the coming months are about making the most of everything connected with life.

This week just gone all our trees have come into leaf with a great energy and I have already spotted swallows flying around. La Bealtaine is a day of hope and a reminder that summer is here. It is a day of great blessing and we ask God to help us make the most of everything connected with life this summer. Perhaps this weekend, we could put our phone or laptop away and get out for a walk in nature or somewhere outdoors. When we connect with nature it has a calming and healing effect and it is a place where we can also feel close to God too.
 
 
 
  Friday
May-06
'They say a person needs just three things to be really happy in this world, someone to love, something to do and something to hope for.' ~Tom Bodett

Sunday (May 1st) was 'La Bealtaine' which translates as May Day. La Bealtaine is a day that goes way back many generations in Irish culture and history. Our ancient and recent farming ancestors relied on significant calendar events to give them reassurance and to remind them when to sow and when to reap. They were very in touch with the rhythms of the seasons, the cycles of the moon and the flow of the seasons.

Our modern world has lost touch with much of these natural connections to earth and what connects us to everything. Bealtaine is one of the four major Irish Celtic annual festivals along with Samhain, Imbolc and Lughnasa. It signifies the return of light and is widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, while May Day celebrations occur throughout Europe.

La Bealtaine was celebrated to mark the beginning of summer. It was a day when the herds of livestock were driven out to summer pastures. The lighting of bonfires on hills and mountains was a part of the tradition. Many farmers still have the lovley tradition of sprinkling holy water on their cattle and farms. At the heart of Bealtaine is a reminder of growth, abundance and life flourishing at this time of year. Summer is a season of energy and fulfillment. The darkness of winter is far behind, the promise of spring has delivered and the coming months are about making the most of everything connected with life.

This week just gone all our trees have come into leaf with a great energy and I have already spotted swallows flying around. La Bealtaine is a day of hope and a reminder that summer is here. It is a day of great blessing and we ask God to help us make the most of everything connected with life this summer. Perhaps this weekend, we could put our phone or laptop away and get out for a walk in nature or somewhere outdoors. When we connect with nature it has a calming and healing effect and it is a place where we can also feel close to God too.
 
 
 
  Thursday
May-05
'They say a person needs just three things to be really happy in this world, someone to love, something to do and something to hope for.' ~Tom Bodett

Sunday (May 1st) was 'La Bealtaine' which translates as May Day. La Bealtaine is a day that goes way back many generations in Irish culture and history. Our ancient and recent farming ancestors relied on significant calendar events to give them reassurance and to remind them when to sow and when to reap. They were very in touch with the rhythms of the seasons, the cycles of the moon and the flow of the seasons.

Our modern world has lost touch with much of these natural connections to earth and what connects us to everything. Bealtaine is one of the four major Irish Celtic annual festivals along with Samhain, Imbolc and Lughnasa. It signifies the return of light and is widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, while May Day celebrations occur throughout Europe.

La Bealtaine was celebrated to mark the beginning of summer. It was a day when the herds of livestock were driven out to summer pastures. The lighting of bonfires on hills and mountains was a part of the tradition. Many farmers still have the lovley tradition of sprinkling holy water on their cattle and farms. At the heart of Bealtaine is a reminder of growth, abundance and life flourishing at this time of year. Summer is a season of energy and fulfillment. The darkness of winter is far behind, the promise of spring has delivered and the coming months are about making the most of everything connected with life.

This week just gone all our trees have come into leaf with a great energy and I have already spotted swallows flying around. La Bealtaine is a day of hope and a reminder that summer is here. It is a day of great blessing and we ask God to help us make the most of everything connected with life this summer. Perhaps this weekend, we could put our phone or laptop away and get out for a walk in nature or somewhere outdoors. When we connect with nature it has a calming and healing effect and it is a place where we can also feel close to God too.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
May-04
'They say a person needs just three things to be really happy in this world, someone to love, something to do and something to hope for.' ~Tom Bodett

Sunday (May 1st) was 'La Bealtaine' which translates as May Day. La Bealtaine is a day that goes way back many generations in Irish culture and history. Our ancient and recent farming ancestors relied on significant calendar events to give them reassurance and to remind them when to sow and when to reap. They were very in touch with the rhythms of the seasons, the cycles of the moon and the flow of the seasons.

Our modern world has lost touch with much of these natural connections to earth and what connects us to everything. Bealtaine is one of the four major Irish Celtic annual festivals along with Samhain, Imbolc and Lughnasa. It signifies the return of light and is widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, while May Day celebrations occur throughout Europe.

La Bealtaine was celebrated to mark the beginning of summer. It was a day when the herds of livestock were driven out to summer pastures. The lighting of bonfires on hills and mountains was a part of the tradition. Many farmers still have the lovley tradition of sprinkling holy water on their cattle and farms. At the heart of Bealtaine is a reminder of growth, abundance and life flourishing at this time of year. Summer is a season of energy and fulfillment. The darkness of winter is far behind, the promise of spring has delivered and the coming months are about making the most of everything connected with life.

This week just gone all our trees have come into leaf with a great energy and I have already spotted swallows flying around. La Bealtaine is a day of hope and a reminder that summer is here. It is a day of great blessing and we ask God to help us make the most of everything connected with life this summer. Perhaps this weekend, we could put our phone or laptop away and get out for a walk in nature or somewhere outdoors. When we connect with nature it has a calming and healing effect and it is a place where we can also feel close to God too.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
May-03
'They say a person needs just three things to be really happy in this world, someone to love, something to do and something to hope for.' ~Tom Bodett

Yesteray was 'La Bealtaine' which translates as May Day. It is a Bank Holiday weekend and a time to rest and unwind for most people. La Bealtaine is a day that goes way back many generations in Irish culture and history. Our ancient and recent farming ancestors relied on significant calendar events to give them reassurance and to remind them when to sow and when to reap. They were very in touch with the rhythms of the seasons, the cycles of the moon and the flow of the seasons.

Our modern world has lost touch with much of these natural connections to earth and what connects us to everything. Bealtaine is one of the four major Irish Celtic annual festivals along with Samhain, Imbolc and Lughnasa. It signifies the return of light and is widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, while May Day celebrations occur throughout Europe.

La Bealtaine was celebrated to mark the beginning of summer. It was a day when the herds of livestock were driven out to summer pastures. The lighting of bonfires on hills and mountains was a part of the tradition. Many farmers still have the lovley tradition of sprinkling holy water on their cattle and farms. At the heart of Bealtaine is a reminder of growth, abundance and life flourishing at this time of year. Summer is a season of energy and fulfillment. The darkness of winter is far behind, the promise of spring has delivered and the coming months are about making the most of everything connected with life.

This week just gone all our trees have come into leaf with a great energy and I have already spotted swallows flying around. La Bealtaine is a day of hope and a reminder that summer is here. It is a day of great blessing and we ask God to help us make the most of everything connected with life this summer. Perhaps this weekend, we could put our phone or laptop away and get out for a walk in nature or somewhere outdoors. When we connect with nature it has a calming and healing effect and it is a place where we can also feel close to God too.
 
 
 
  Monday
May-02
'They say a person needs just three things to be really happy in this world, someone to love, something to do and something to hope for.' ~Tom Bodett

Yesteray was 'La Bealtaine' which translates as May Day. It is a Bank Holiday weekend and a time to rest and unwind for most people. La Bealtaine is a day that goes way back many generations in Irish culture and history. Our ancient and recent farming ancestors relied on significant calendar events to give them reassurance and to remind them when to sow and when to reap. They were very in touch with the rhythms of the seasons, the cycles of the moon and the flow of the seasons.

Our modern world has lost touch with much of these natural connections to earth and what connects us to everything. Bealtaine is one of the four major Irish Celtic annual festivals along with Samhain, Imbolc and Lughnasa. It signifies the return of light and is widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, while May Day celebrations occur throughout Europe.

La Bealtaine was celebrated to mark the beginning of summer. It was a day when the herds of livestock were driven out to summer pastures. The lighting of bonfires on hills and mountains was a part of the tradition. Many farmers still have the lovley tradition of sprinkling holy water on their cattle and farms. At the heart of Bealtaine is a reminder of growth, abundance and life flourishing at this time of year. Summer is a season of energy and fulfillment. The darkness of winter is far behind, the promise of spring has delivered and the coming months are about making the most of everything connected with life.

This week just gone all our trees have come into leaf with a great energy and I have already spotted swallows flying around. La Bealtaine is a day of hope and a reminder that summer is here. It is a day of great blessing and we ask God to help us make the most of everything connected with life this summer. Perhaps this weekend, we could put our phone or laptop away and get out for a walk in nature or somewhere outdoors. When we connect with nature it has a calming and healing effect and it is a place where we can also feel close to God too.
 
 
 
  Sunday
May-01
'They say a person needs just three things to be really happy in this world, someone to love, something to do and something to hope for.' ~Tom Bodett

Today is 'La Bealtaine' which translates as May Day and it is also the feast of St Joseph the worker. It is a Bank Holiday weekend and a time to rest and unwind for most people. La Bealtaine is a day that goes way back many generations in Irish culture and history. Our ancient and recent farming ancestors relied on significant calendar events to give them reassurance and to remind them when to sow and when to reap. They were very in touch with the rhythms of the seasons, the cycles of the moon and the flow of the seasons.

Our modern world has lost touch with much of these natural connections to earth and what connects us to everything. Bealtaine is one of the four major Irish Celtic annual festivals along with Samhain, Imbolc and Lughnasa. It signifies the return of light and is widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, while May Day celebrations occur throughout Europe.

La Bealtaine was celebrated to mark the beginning of summer. It was a day when the herds of livestock were driven out to summer pastures. The lighting of bonfires on hills and mountains was a part of the tradition. Many farmers still have the lovley tradition of sprinkling holy water on their cattle and farms. At the heart of Bealtaine is a reminder of growth, abundance and life flourishing at this time of year. Summer is a season of energy and fulfillment. The darkness of winter is far behind, the promise of spring has delivered and the coming months are about making the most of everything connected with life.

This week just gone all our trees have come into leaf with a great energy and I have already spotted swallows flying around. La Bealtaine is a day of hope and a reminder that summer is here. It is a day of great blessing and we ask God to help us make the most of everything connected with life this summer. Perhaps this weekend, we could put our phone or laptop away and get out for a walk in nature or somewhere outdoors. When we connect with nature it has a calming and healing effect and it is a place where we can also feel close to God too.
 
 

 

Copyright © Today is My Gift to You